Academic wellbeing and attitudes to learning of Key Stage 2 pupils following the pandemic

  • Academic wellbeing has dropped across all dimensions (positivity, motivation, resilience, and self-efficacy) since the pre-pandemic period
  • Pupils in Year 3 have seen the largest reductions in wellbeing
  • The majority of children now feel some vulnerability in self-efficacy
  • Across all year groups, girls feel more positive than boys
  • Across all year groups, boys reported feeling greater self-efficacy than girls
  • Pupils in the North of England gave more satisfactory responses across all dimensions of academic wellbeing

 

Omicron, Eunice and Heatmageddon: Oak National Academy usage during 2021-2022

  • While Oak received less use than during the early-2021 lockdown, it remained popular by almost any standard. Furthermore, usage tended to increase markedly during periods of disruption to schools, such as the COVID-19 omicron wave, Storm Eunice and the July 2022 heatwave.
  • Coverage of secondary schools (74%) was much higher than primary schools (37%). It also tended to be higher among state schools and urban schools, though this is at least in part because such schools tend to be larger.
  • Allowing for their different pupil populations, teacher and pupil usage tended to be higher in poorer areas.
  • Pupils in poorer localities were slightly less likely to watch video lessons all the way through and were also less likely to use a computer rather than a mobile phone or tablet device.
  • The type of device being used had a large effect on median session duration. Those on mobile phones were only about 25% as long as those on computers or tablet devices. There were no obvious differences between pupils in poorer or more affluent areas when they were using similar devices.
  • Across England, Google Classroom appears to have been a more popular online teaching environment than Microsoft Teams, particularly in the south, but with exceptions in some parts of the country.

Figure 1: Pupil and teacher activity (1st September 2021 - 30th June 2022)
Sources: Oak National Academy; SchoolDash analysis.
Figure 2: Oak activity and school absences during the COVID-19 omicron wave (6th September 2021 - 4th March 2022)
Sources: Department for Education; Oak National Academy; SchoolDash analysis.
Note: Days of exceptionally high pupil activity during 4th-6th January, which coincided with the start of the spring term, and on 18th February, which was the date of Storm Eunice, have been omitted.
Figure 3: Pupil and teacher activity during the July 2022 heatwave
Sources: Oak National Academy; SchoolDash analysis.
Figure 4: Coverage by school type (1st September 2021 - 30th June 2022)
Notes: School deprivation figures are based on pupils' eligibility for free school meals, with bands defined by the DfE. A low proportion of EAL pupils means less than 4% and a high proportion means more than 15%. Small primary schools have fewer than 200 pupils, large ones have more than 320; for secondary and all-through schools, the thresholds are 700 and 1,200, respectively. Small MATs are those with 10 or fewer schools. Urban, suburban and rural groups use ONS categories applied to school postcodes. Coastal schools are those within 5km of the shoreline.
Sources: Oak National Academy; SchoolDash analysis.
Figure 5: Relative teacher activity by school type (1st September 2021 - 30th June 2022)
Notes: See notes to Figure 4.
Sources: Oak National Academy; SchoolDash analysis.
Figure 6: Activity by region and local deprivation level (1st September 2021 - 30th June 2022)
Notes: Local deprivation quintiles use Income Deprivation Affecting Children Index (IDACI) data from the Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities (DLUHC). Quintile 1 represents the least deprived areas and Quintile 5 the most deprived.
Sources: Oak National Academy; DLUHC; SchoolDash analysis.
Figure 7: Video completion by region and local deprivation level (1st September 2021 - 30th June 2022)
Notes: See notes to Figure 6.
Sources: Oak National Academy; DLUHC; SchoolDash analysis.
Figure 8: Proportions of lesson starts by device type
Sources: Oak National Academy; SchoolDash analysis.
Figure 9: Computer use by local deprivation level (1st September 2021 - 30th June 2022)
Notes: See notes to Figure 6.
Sources: Oak National Academy; SchoolDash analysis.
Figure 10: Median session duration by device type
Sources: Oak National Academy; SchoolDash analysis.
Figure 11: Median session duration by local deprivation rate and device type (1st September 2021 - 30th June 2022)
Notes: See notes to Figure 6.
Sources: Oak National Academy; SchoolDash analysis.
Figure 12: Proportions of teacher shares by platform (1st September 2021 - 30th June 2022)
Sources: Oak National Academy; SchoolDash analysis.
 

Previous posts

 | Copyright © 2022 |